Street safety comments walk Walsh into trouble

Others said Walsh’s comments were based on misconceptions and inaccuracies. Though the mayor’s comments focused on people wearing headphones or darting in and out of traffic, data show that at least four of the 15 pedestrians killed in Boston last year were over 65. Two others were children under 3. The ages of five of the 15 victims have not been released, according to data from the pedestrian advocacy group WalkBoston. --- The city committed to a Vision Zero policy in 2015.

Boston needs to figure out how to share the roads

Yet Walsh’s overall reaction to the controversy is also disappointing. Instead of stewing self-defensively, he should meet with advocates like Becca Wolfson of Boston Cyclists Union and Brendan Kearney of WalkBoston. They are capable of dialogue, not diatribe, and want to talk about issues like dangerous intersections, the need to fix signal timing, and creating more protected bike lanes. “This really is about making Boston a city where it is safe for people to get around no matter how they are doing it,” said Kearney.

Signal Timing

WalkBoston staff and supporters are continually sending in information to the City of Boston to press for improvements to make signals work better for people walking. When someone says "we need to make the signals work better," what does that mean? We've posted a draft document of how to make signals work better for people walking in Boston and would love feedback - what is missing, what needs to be modified, or other general comments? With over 850 signalized intersections in the City of Boston, there is much to be done.

Bump for Walsh on city’s mean streets

The city committed to a Vision Zero policy in 2015. The concept, said Brendan Kearney, communications director for WalkBoston, “is grounded in the premise that people make mistakes — so the streets should be designed to minimize injury and loss of life no matter how people are getting around.” “We should not be blaming the people that were hit and killed,” Kearney said in an e-mail.

Ped101 Info Session

WalkBoston offers free, beginner pedestrian advocacy trainings at our office titled "Ped 101,” and we'd love you to come! Our goal is to help build the constituency of people that are comfortable to speak up for walking in their own community. Sessions are a small group, guided conversation and take place in our conference room - so please make sure to sign up in advance. 


Ped101 Info Session

WalkBoston offers free, beginner pedestrian advocacy trainings at our office titled "Ped 101,” and we'd love you to come! Our goal is to help build the constituency of people that are comfortable to speak up for walking in their own community. Sessions are a small group, guided conversation and take place in our conference room - so please make sure to sign up in advance. 

sign up at ped101.eventbrite.com

One legacy of Jane Jacobs: community walks around the globe

“We want to get people more devoted to the idea that this is their neighborhood,” said [WalkBoston Board President] Matt Lawlor, cofounder of WalkUp Roslindale, the local advocacy group organizing the walk. “If you don’t speak up for it, who will?”

Boston Traffic Sucks—Here’s How to Fix It

Those goals are shared by local transportation advocates. WalkBoston’s Kearney, for one, believes many of the city’s intersections offer opportunities to prioritize increasing mobility over moving cars. At Park Street, “the sheer number of [pedestrians] is so much greater than the number of vehicles going down Tremont,” he says. “Those light cycles should be shorter. Instead of waiting a minute and a half and then getting a long pedestrian walk signal, why not cut that to 60 seconds, or 45 seconds?”

WalkBoston 2016 Annual Report

WalkBoston 2016 Annual Report  Our 2016 Annual Report, as prepared for 27th Annual Celebration (March 29th, 2017).

Pages

Subscribe to WalkBoston RSS